Welcome to
Your Heart
Tap on the screen to continue
Main Page
Please press on one of the following areas tocontinue
Welcome to Your Heart!
Tap the screen to move through the page.
To move through a page you will have to tap on the screen to make images and textappear.  When tapping is necessary to move through a page “Tap to continue” will beshown on the top right part of the screen.
To navigate through this app, several buttons will be available.
When it’s time to move on from a page, the “Tap to continue” message will disappear. Ifyou tap the screen, the suggested button you should press next will pulse.
Instructions
Tap to continue
Excellent!
Introduction
Your heart muscle is made up of 20 billion cells,that pump litres of blood around your bodyper minute.
The heart is crucial organ for supplying yourbody with oxygen and nutrients, as well asremoving waste, meaning fully functioningheart is important.
Heart disease is the largest cause of death inEngland, although due to medical and surgicalinterventions, as well as behavioral changes, thenumber of fatalities per year is decreasing.
Tap to continue
Introduction
This aim of this resource is to help increaseyour understanding of:
The heart’s normal function.
The most common ways the heart can dysfunction.
What heart disease is and how it happens.
The risk factors which can lead to heart disease.
Heart structure and function
Please press on one of the following sections tocontinue
Heart structure and function
The heart consists of four chambers.
The left atrium and the right atrium arein the upper part of the heart.  Blood entersthese atria through veins.
The left ventricle and the right ventricleare in the lower part of the heart. Atria pushblood into the ventricles, then the ventriclescontract pumping the blood out of the heart.
Parts of the heart
Press the video to make it start
Right atrium
Left atrium
Right ventricle
Left ventricle
Tap to continue
Blood flow in the heart
Heart structure and function
The blood transports oxygen and nutrientsaround the body, which the body needs tofunction.
After distributing oxygen around the body, theblood arrives at the heart with reduced oxygencontent.
This blood is known as deoxygenated blood.
Tap to continue
Blood flow in the heart
Heart structure and function
Deoxygenated blood enters the heartthrough the vena cavae and fills the rightatrium.
The right atrium contracts, pushing blood intothe right ventricle.
The right ventricle then contracts, movingblood into the pulmonary artery whichleads to the lungs.
Right atrium
Vena Cavae
Right ventricle
Pulmonaryartery
Tap to continue
Blood flow in the heart
Heart structure and function
The blood absorbs oxygen in the lungs andbecomes oxygenated bloodwhich thenreturns to the heart through the pulmonaryvein and fills the left atrium.
The left atrium then contracts, moving theblood to the left ventricle.
The left ventricle then contracts and blood ismoved into the aorta and is pushed aroundthe body.
Left atrium
Pulmonary vein
Left ventricle
Aorta
Tap to continue
An important point to note is the heart itselfneeds oxygen to function.
This blood is supplied through the coronaryarterieswhich can be seen on the outside of theheart.
Keeping continuous, high blood flow to the heartthrough coronary arteries is important, as theheart needs to continuously beat and thereforerequires large amount of oxygen.
Function of the blood supply
Heart structure and function
Coronary arteries
Tap to continue
Common heart dysfunctions
Please press on one of the following sections tocontinue
Common heart dysfunctions
Arrhythmias
Whilst at rest, the average heart rate is between 60to100 beats per minute.
An arrhythmia is when the heart beats outside ofthis range at rest.
If the heart beats below 60 beats per minute, it iscalled bradycardia.
If the heart beats above 100 beats per minute, thisis known as tachycardia.
Tap to continue
Common heart dysfunctions
Arrhythmias
Arrhythmias are not always dangerous. Athletesmay have bradycardia when at rest, as the heartmoves the necessary amounts of oxygen aroundthe body with fewer beats.
However, an arrhythmia can be dangerous as it canchange the blood pressure in the body, as well asaffecting the way in which the heart contracts.
Tap to continue
Arrhythmias
Common heart dysfunctions
How dangerous arrhythmias are depends on:
The type of arrhythmia.
The origin of the arrhythmia within the heart.
The severity of the arrhythmia.
An Electrocardiograph (ECG) can be used to testfor arrhythmias, as well as detecting the type ofarrhythmia.
ECGs work by monitoring the heart’s electricalactivity.
Press the video to make it start
An ECG
Tap to continue
Arrhythmias
Common heart dysfunctions
Arrhythmias occur when electrical signalsthat travel through the heart, making theheart contract, become altered.
This video shows how electrical signals movethrough the heart, and how this appears onan ECG.
Abnormalities on an ECG can show whichpart of the heart is dysfunctional.
Press the video to make it start
Electrical activity in the heart
ECG
Tap to continue
Arrhythmias
Common heart dysfunctions
Arrhythmias can be caused either bychanges in the heart, or changes in thesignals the heart receives from the brain.
Symptoms of Arrhythmias include:
Chest pain
Fainting
Light headedness
Paleness
Shortness of breath
Sweating
Tap to continue
Angina pectoris
Common heart dysfunctions
Angina occurs when the heart muscle doesn’treceive enough oxygen to work at the speed itneeds to beat at.
common cause of angina is heart disease.
Heart disease is condition where part of thecoronary artery is blocked, reducing blood flowand therefore reducing the amount of oxygendelivered to part of the heart.
Tap to continue
Angina pectoris
Common heart dysfunctions
The most common symptom is “visceral pain”, adiffuse, hard to describe pain, that can occuranywhere from the chest to the lower abdomenand can be mistaken for indigestion.
However, angina can cause pain elsewhere, suchas the shoulders or jaw, or may cause nosymptoms at all.
Tap to continue
Angina pectoris
Common heart dysfunctions
Other symptoms include;
Nausea
Tiredness
Difficulty breathing
Dizziness
Restlessness
Belching
Angina pectoris
Common heart dysfunctions
Overall, angina can limit physical activity, hurting ormaking the person tired when the heart’s demandfor oxygen is higher than can be delivered.
Anginas can also occur for no externally visiblereason, when the ability of the artery to supply theheart decreases.
Tap to continue
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
The medical term for heart attack is amyocardial infarction.
heart attack occurs when the bloodsupply to the heart through the coronaryarteries is interrupted, and blood flow topart of the heart is low enough to causecells in the heart to die.
Tap to continue
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
Most commonly, heart attack occurs inthe left ventricle.
heart attack can happen for severaldifferent reasons, but the most commoncause is the blockage of blood flowthrough the coronary arteries.
This is often due to heart disease.
Left ventricle
Tap to continue
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
Tap to continue
Almost as soon as blood flow in thecoronary arteries is sufficiently blocked,the hearts ability to contract decreases.
This reduces the hearts ability to pumpblood.
Death of the cells in the heart beginsabout 15 to 40 minutes after the bloodsupply around the heart is cut off.
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
Usually during heart attack the heartcontinues to beat, but its ability to pump theblood with sufficient force can be reduced,reducing the hearts ability to supply the bodyand most importantly the brain.
Due to muscle death in the heart, even if theblockage which caused the heart attack isremoved, the heart may not be able to recover.
Tap to continue
Symptoms of heart attack are very similar toangina pectoris.
The main symptom is chest pain, which may feel asif it is travelling towards an arm or both arms.
heart attack can also cause pain in the jaw, neck,back or abdomen, or may cause no symptoms atall.
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
Tap to continue
Heart attack
Common heart dysfunctions
Other symptoms for heart attack include;
Coughing
Wheezing
Feeling sick
Feeling unable to breath
Dizziness
Feeling an overwhelming sense of doom
The development of heart disease
Please press on one of the following sections tocontinue
Heart disease basics
The development of heart disease
Atherosclerotic plaques
Heart disease is clinically known as coronaryheart diseaseas it is disease occurring in thecoronary arteries.
Heart disease is most commonly caused byatherosclerosis.
Atherosclerosis is process where cholesteroland white blood cells build up in the walls ofcoronary arteries, leading to atheroscleroticplaques.
Tap to continue
Heart disease basics
The development of heart disease
Plaques start growing early on in life, and simpleplaques are found in coronary arteries from thesecond decade of life.
These original plaques are relatively safe andsymptomless.
However, if these plaques continue to grow andbecome more complex, they can cause heartdisease.
Atherosclerotic plaques
Tap to continue
Heart disease basics
The development of heart disease
Fatty plaque
More complexplaque
Blood clot
Reduced blood flow orno blood flow
The original simple plaques are known as fattyplaques.
If fatty plaques in the walls of the coronary arteriesbuild up, these may become complex plaques.
Complex plaques may reduce blood flow into ablood vessel, by either partially blocking the arteryor by leading to the creation of blood clot.
Due to the blockage of the coronary artery, theheart receives less oxygen and this can often causeanginas and heart attacks.
Tap to continue
The progression of plaques
The development of heart disease
Endothelium
Subendothelial space
Arteries are made up of several layers.
The innermost layer, the endotheliumis madeup of thin layer of cells called endothelial cells.
Directly behind the endothelium is thesubendothelial space, which connects theendothelium to layer of muscle cells in theartery.
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
Cholesterol enters the subendothelial space,through the endothelium, causing changes inthe artery wall.
This causes white blood cells to enter thesubendothelial space, leading to even morechanges in the artery wall.
Together these early changes cause even morecholesterol and white blood cells toaccumulate in the artery wall.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
As the environment within the artery wall changes,the cholesterol is modified.
The altered cholesterol causes changes in the whiteblood cells, such as:
No longer removing cholesterol as effectively.
No longer removing dead cells as effectively.
Cell death.
Overall the accumulation of cholesterol and whiteblood cells has now lead to fatty plaque.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
Aorta
Coronary artery
Fatty plaques are extremely common and can befound in aortas from birth and coronary arteriesfrom the second decade of life.
These plaques are symptomless and are relativelyharmless.
However, plaques can change to be more complexand these more complex plaques are largerthreat.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
Plaques can progress to become fibrous plaques.
Fibrous plaques have hardened exterior to theinside of the blood vessel, and can act as aprotective barrier to stop the harmful materialinside the plaque from coming into contact withthe blood.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
Inside the fibrous plaque, cells continue to die andthese cells are not removed.
The accumulation of dead cells causes the plaque tohave necrotic core.
The necrotic core is an area filled with dead celldebri and other material, which leads to furtherchanges in the artery, increasing the plaquescomplexity.
Overall, changes within the necrotic core meanfactors are released that cause more cells to die andbreakdown the fibrous material.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
The likelihood of the plaque’s endotheliumbreaking, releasing the inner material into theblood vessel, is known as the plaque’s stability.
Multiple factors affect plaque’s stability, and if thebreakdown of fibrous material and cell deathbecomes higher, the plaque becomes less stable.
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
The development of heart disease
If the plaque becomes unstable it is more likely tobreak.
If the plaque breaks, the plaques contents comeinto contact with the blood.
When this happens this will lead to blood clotforming at the site where the plaque breaks,leading to larger blockage of the artery.
This can cause an angina or heart attack.
blood clot blocking an artery
The progression of plaques
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Please press on one of the following sections tocontinue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
The risk factors for heart disease
Risk factors contribute to plaque progression andcan also affect the stability of complex plaques.
Risk factors for heart disease include;
High blood cholesterol
High blood pressure (hypertension)
Diabetes
Obesity
Smoking
Unhealthy diet
Inactivity
Stress
Family history
Age
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
The risk factors for heart disease
From 2000 to 2007, fatalities from heart disease inthe England decreased by 36% (29,069 fewerdeaths)[1].
52% of the reduced fatalities were suggested to beattributable to medical and surgical interventions,however, 34% were attributable to the populationreducing their risk factors.
These statistics demonstrate clear, significantbenefit in people reducing their risk factors.
Tap to continue
1. Bajekal, M., S. Scholes, H. Love, N. Hawkins, M.O'Flaherty, R. Raine, and S. Capewell, 2012, Analysingrecent socioeconomic trends in coronary heartdisease mortality in England, 2000-2007: populationmodelling study: Plos Medicine, v. 9.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
The risk factors for heart disease
Tap to continue
Behavioural risk factors for heart disease include:
Smoking
Unhealthy diet
Inactivity
Many of the risk factors for heart disease are related, suchas unhealthy diet, inactivity and obesity.
However, each risk factor alone increases plaqueprogression, and an unhealthy diet without obesity stillincreases the chances of heart disease.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Smoking
Smoking contains many toxic compounds, including cyanide,arsenic and carbon monoxide.
One 50 year study on over 34,000 participants, in the UK, hassuggested about half of all persistent cigarette smokers arekilled by their habit [1].
Smoking is commonly known to cause lung cancer, however,this study suggested smoking is equally likely to increase thechance of fatality from heart disease.
Throughout the 50 year study, it was suggested there is 62%increase in heart disease fatalities in current smokerscompared to non-smokers.
Tap to continue
1. Doll, R., R. Peto, J. Boreham, and I. Sutherland, 2004,Mortality in relation to smoking: 50 years' observations onmale British doctors: British Medical Journal, v. 328, p.1519-1528.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Smoking
It has been suggested that smoking increasesplaque progression at several stages,  including:
The accumulation of cholesterol and white blood cells inthe artery wall.
The changes that occur in cholesterol and white bloodcells.
The breakdown of the artery wall.
Increasing blood clot formation in the artery.
This leads to smokers having an increase inplaques, an increase in the amount of morecomplex plaques, and an increase in the chanceof blood clots forming.
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Smoking
Overall, plaque progression is increased insmokers and one study showed the progressionof plaques in smokers is increased by 50% over 3years [1].
Studies suggest some of the effects of smoking onplaque progression may be irreversible.
However, quitting smoking has been shown tosignificantly reduce the chance of having heartattack.
Tap to continue
1. Howard, G., L. E. Wagenknecht, G. L. Burke, A. Diez-Roux, G. W.Evans, P. McGovern, J. Nieto, and G. S. Tell, 1998, Cigarette smokingand progression of atherosclerosis - The atherosclerosis risk incommunities (ARIC) study: Jama-Journal of the American MedicalAssociation, v. 279.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Unhealthy diet
An unhealthy diet can lead to obesity, diabetes andhigh blood pressure, but also has direct effects onthe progression of plaques.
One way in which an unhealthy diet can directlycause an increase in plaque progression, is byincreasing blood cholesterol.  However, the type ofcholesterol is important.
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Unhealthy diet
It is important to note that cholesterol isessential for the body, but there are differenttypes. Some lead to an increase in plaqueprogression, but some have protective actions.
Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is the badcholesterol, which accumulates in plaques.
High density lipoprotein (HDL) is goodcholesterol, which has protective effects againstplaque progression and LDL accumulation.
HDL
LDL
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Unhealthy diet
The ratio between HDL and LDL is important.
If there is larger amount of LDL to HDL thenthe risk of plaque progression and heart diseaseis higher.
HDL
LDL
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Unhealthy diet
One of the main ways to reduce the amountof LDL is to reduce the amount of trans-fatsand saturated fats eaten, replacing these forpolyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats[1].
Trans-fats are often found in commercialbakery and deep fried foods.
Trans-fats also increase other factorsinvolved in the progression of plaques.
Tap to continue
1. Hu, F. B., and W. C. Willett, 2002, Optimal dietsfor prevention of coronary heart disease: Jama-Journal of the American Medical Association, v. 288,p. 2569-2578.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Unhealthy diet
The best way to increase the proportion ofhealthier fats you eat, is to increase intake ofproducts such as nuts, fish and non-hydrogenated vegetable oil, as well as reducinglevels of red meat and dairy products.
Information about the quantities of thedifferent types of fats in products, can often befound on the back of food packages.
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Inactivity
Inactivity is suggested to lead to direct increase inmortality, but also leads to increased blood pressure,obesity and diabetes.
Increased exercise puts more strain on the heart overshorter periods of time, but over longer periods leadsto less strain, causing the hearts demand for oxygen todecrease.
The recommended guidelines for exercise is minimumof 30 minutes of moderate activity times week,which only 42% of men and 31% of women achieve [1].
Tap to continue
1. Townsend N, Wickramasinghe K, Bhatnagar P, Smolina K, Nichols M, Leal J,Luengo-Fernandez R, Rayner (2012). Coronary heart disease statistics 2012edition. British Heart Foundation: London, p. 108
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Symptoms
Coronary heart disease is often symptomless untilmajor events such as anginas or heart attacksoccur.
Furthermore, some of the risk factors, such ashigh blood pressure may show no symptoms, so itcan be difficult for person to assess their risk.
By consulting doctor, tests can be performed toassess persons risk of heart disease and itsprogression.
Tap to continue
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Summary
In summary, reducing risk factors from an early age can reduce the chances of gettingheart disease later in life.
Reducing risk factors when older, can also reduce plaque progression and increasingactivities such as walking can be effective.
Some research suggests that preventable or controllable risk factors account for 90% ofheart attacks. So understanding and controlling risk factors is important [1].
For more information on risk factors and risk factor reduction, please visit the BritishHeart Foundation website.
1. Gyarfas, I., M. Keltai, and Y. Salim, 2006, Effect of potentially modifiablerisk factors associated with myocardial infarction in 52 countries (theINTERHEART study): case-control study: Orvosi Hetilap, v. 147, p. 675-686.
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Summary
Thank you for completing the Your Heart app!
Heart disease: Risk factors and symptoms
Permissions
The video in the Common heart dysfunctions” area in the “Arrhythmias” section was taken from theuser Kalumet from the Wikimedia website at http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ECG_principle_slow.gif.
All other videos were taken from the University of California website at http://www.ucopenaccess.org/.
Pictures in area Heart structure and function” in the section Function of the blood supply” were takenfrom the Visible Body website at  http://inst.visiblebody.com/index.html.
Pictures in the area Heart disease:  Risk factors and symptoms” in the section “ unhealthy diet” of pork,milk and baked goods are pictures taken by the designer of “Your Heart”.
All other pictures including the backgrounds, were purchased under limited license from theShutterstock website at http://www.shutterstock.com.